video

The Atlantic: Established media see the key to their survival online

Friday, April 20, 2012 - 11:15am

"These days, even the stalwarts of traditional media make themselves available on call, on screens of all sizes, and in evolving ecosystems of free and paid versions," writes Peter Osnos in The Atlantic. "What were once simply great newspapers, magazines, television, and radio are now websites with all the trappings, and that's where the audiences seem to be headed in droves."

The nation's most-established and traditional sources of news have all made very significant investments in digital distribution: online video, blogs, photo galleries, podcasting, mobile applications, widgets, and more.

"Major public radio stations, such as WNYC in New York, WBUR in Boston, and WBEZ in Chicago, have also turned their websites into bastions of multimedia to build their audience share."

What of social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.)? While "not yet the moneymaker forecasted for it," it is useful to spread "the word for those digital products that are generating cash."

Read "Even Old Media Institutions Are Acting Like New Media" in The Atlantic online here.

Vevo seeing big growth after adding personalizable radio-like features

Thursday, March 22, 2012 - 12:15pm

VevoEarlier this year web video service vevo relaunched its site with a number of new, web radio-like features (like Echo Nest-based recommendations and instant playlist generation; RAIN coverage here).

Since then, the number of videos streamed by user has increased by 70% and Facebook sharing has grown 100%, according to Vevo CEO Rio Caraeff.

The Next Web has more coverage here.

Local content hubs earned top rankings in January, according to comScore

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 11:35am

CBS Radio's Philadelphia web portalCBS Radio has found success with its 30 local web portals: comScore ranked them as some of the top local websites online in January. Now the broadcaster plans to take what it's learned and remake its music radio station websites.

CBS began launching local website hubs in 2010, aggregating content from local TV stations, sports radio stations and talk/news stations (RAIN coverage here; see an example portal for Philadelphia here).

"While some radio companies are doubling down on streaming or daily deals, CBS has opted for a more diversified digital business model," writes Inside Radio. "The diversification strategy is paying off."

In January, the network ranked first in Time Spent among regional local media sites, according to comScore. CBS' portals also ranked second in page views, fifth in unique visitosr and visits. "The rankings are especially noteworthy in light of the fact that CBS Local operates in just 30 markets compared to many of its competitors [AOL Patch, MSN Local, Yelp, Yahoo Local and CityGrid], which operate in as many as 150-200 markets," observes Inside Radio.

CBS says unique visitors grew 43% last year ("the fastest growth in our entire peer group," according to CEO Les Moonves). The local hubs are also generating new revenue for CBS, tapping into daily deals, online directories, ecommerce, affinity clubs, performance advertising and other services. "There are real dollars we’re going to start seeing," said Moonves.

CBS Radio's 97.1 new website

Now CBS is "taking a lot of the best practices and strategies we learned... from CBS Local Digital Media and applying them to the music business," according to CBS Local Digital Media president Ezra Kucharz. Specifically, its music radio station websites.

CBS moved its music radio stations to the Local Digital Media division in December, away from CBS Interactive Music Group. Last week CBS began rennovating its music radio station websites -- starting with CHR stations -- looking to add a unified design, social media integration, video, improved advertising and tie-ins with Last.fm, Local Offers and Metro Lyrics.

Inside Radio points to 97.1 KAMP (here and pictured left) as an example of the new website design: archived video interviews, embedded Twitter feeds and easy access to either buy songs recently played on-air or build custom Last.fm stations.

You can subscribe to Inside Radio's daily newsletters here.

Video service VEVO adds web radio-like personalization features

Friday, March 9, 2012 - 11:30am

VEVOOnline video service VEVO (the second largest such site after YouTube) has added new features that should sound familiar to fans of personalizable web radio. "It makes the experience more competitive with Spotify and Pandora than before, with the added benefit of videos," in TechCrunch's opinion.

Among the new features:

  • Integration with music intelligence platform The Echo Nest to offer personalized music video recommendations.
  • Integration with Facebook to offer custom playlists based on Facebook likes and activities.
  • Integration with iTunes to create a playlist filled with videos by users' most listened-to artists.
  • VEVO now plays music videos continuously, making it "more of a long-play" service, TechCrunch writes (here).

(We should note that, for whatever reason, RAIN couldn't find or wasn't offered any of the Facebook, Echo Nest or iTunes features on VEVO's website).

Cost-sharing arrangement might help publishers engage consumers wary of high mobile data usage

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 - 11:35am

Think of it as "free shipping," or a toll-free phone number.

Companies that provide video, audio, and gaming mobile content have been grappling with the idea that consumers might be reluctant to access high-bandwidth mobile content for fear violating monthly limits and incurring high charges. Now, AT&T is saying they may introduce a system in which the provider of the mobile service (e.g. Pandora, YouTube, AccuRadio) would cover the data cost. The Wall Street Journal reported no response from content providers, so it's not clear if AT&T would even find any takers.

AT&T spokesman John Donovan told the paper, "What they're saying is, why don't we go create new revenue streams that don't exist today and find a way to split them." 

What's also unclear is whether such a system might have "net neutrality" implications. "Some consumer advocates reacted with dismay, arguing that AT&T could stifle competition and shift the playing field toward well-heeled app developers and content providers that have the financial capacity to subsidize mobile customers' data use," writes the paper. 

Read more here.

Live P2P streaming protocol could potentially vastly improve audio streaming efficiency

Friday, February 17, 2012 - 10:00am

This week, at the SanFran MusicTech Summit, BitTorrent inventor Bram Cohen demonstrated "P2P live streaming," which could potentially enable real-time video and audio streaming to millions of users without the need for a costly and high-performance central infrastructure.

While the focus for the P2P live streaming protocol is to make the heavy data loads of video events managable for Internet streaming, it could also potentially mean enormous savings for pure audio streaming, greatly reducing costs and allowing for higher bit-rate content (thus higher fidelity), more channels (for surround), etc. It should be noted that there have been other technologies that used a peer-to-peer style structure to decrease streaming costs and improve efficiency. But Cohen says he's rebuilt his technology from scratch, so his efforts may indeed the most advanced yet.

As you may know, BitTorrent was invented to make it easier to quickly distribute large files over the Internet. Instead of downloading an entire file from a single server, with BitTorrent, everyone accessing the file becomes (in BitTorrent parlance) a "swarm" of hosts, downloading and uploading fragments of the file from and to each other at the same time, until everyone has the complete file. GigaOm reports that BitTorrent (Cohen's company) is running "field tests" of weekly streaming live music events using the P2P protocol.

Read GigaOm's coverage here.

Syndicate content