television

CDS Mobile to connect national advertisers to local radio, TV, and newspaper mobile sites

Thursday, May 3, 2012 - 12:05pm

Cox Digital Solutions has launched CDS Mobile, a new division to allow national advertisers to buy ads on local media mobile sites and national "vertical content" sites.

"Advertisers would potentially have the option of getting discounted rates from a cross-platform buy," MediaPost writes. "Cox will also offer publishers a suite of ad-serving technologies and tools for mobile, as it now does for Web advertising."

Leif Welch, who'll lead the new division, estimates Cox Digital’s mobile audience at about 90 million unique monthly visitors.

Cox Media Group itself owns 86 radio stations in 20 U.S. markets, as well as newspapers, television stations, and a cable channel. Cox mobile sites alone attracted 912 million page views in 2011, and mobile now accounts for 15%-30% of all digital inventory (according to Leif Welch, who'll lead CDS Mobile). The Cox Digital network (which extends beyond Cox-owned media) consists of over 2,600 total local newspaper, TV, and radio websites.

Mobile web and content traffoc has generally grown much faster than publishers' ability to monetize that audience. MediaPost reports that unsold mobile inventory is estimated at 80% across the industry -- and that's after last year's estimated 149% growth (to $1.6 billion) in U.S. mobile ad spending in 2011.

Read MediaPost's coverage here. The Cox Digital Solutions press release is here.

The Atlantic: Established media see the key to their survival online

Friday, April 20, 2012 - 11:15am

"These days, even the stalwarts of traditional media make themselves available on call, on screens of all sizes, and in evolving ecosystems of free and paid versions," writes Peter Osnos in The Atlantic. "What were once simply great newspapers, magazines, television, and radio are now websites with all the trappings, and that's where the audiences seem to be headed in droves."

The nation's most-established and traditional sources of news have all made very significant investments in digital distribution: online video, blogs, photo galleries, podcasting, mobile applications, widgets, and more.

"Major public radio stations, such as WNYC in New York, WBUR in Boston, and WBEZ in Chicago, have also turned their websites into bastions of multimedia to build their audience share."

What of social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.)? While "not yet the moneymaker forecasted for it," it is useful to spread "the word for those digital products that are generating cash."

Read "Even Old Media Institutions Are Acting Like New Media" in The Atlantic online here.

Radioplayer a testament to cooperation, fairness, and product-focus, says The Telegraph

Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 11:40am

You many know Radioplayer (see RAIN coverage here) is the online aggregate of radio in Britain, 315 streaming audio channels and on-demand content. It's a not-for-profit cooperative co-owned by the BBC and (most of) the UK's commercial radio industry, launched one year ago this month.

Today Radioplayer boasts seven million monthly unique users. And it represents a victory in successfully transitioning traditional media to an online platform, compared to television in the UK, says Emma Barnett, The Telegraph's Digital Media Editor.

"Where British TV companies have failed... the radio industry has genuinely managed to build a successful aggregator through clever cooperation and by focusing on the product, rather than the potential new revenue streams," she wrote. "British TV content crucially still doesn’t have a single web player."

Each participating station is given equal prominence in the player, and each displays their own advertising and content. And there is total autonomy for each contributing station. Radioplayer managing director Michael Hill credits the platform's success to "its fairness, openness and its not-for-profit status."

Radioplayer also generates revenue (which goes back into developing and improving the player) by licensing its technology. Two such improvements are the coming mobile app and an app for Internet connected television systems (more here).

Read coverage from The Telegraph here.

 

Radio sees ulterior motives in music industry's support for TV spectrum auction

Friday, November 18, 2011 - 12:00pm

Four music industry lobby groups sent a letter to the Congressional debt-reduction "supercommittee" yesterday, encouraging lawmakers to let the FCC auction television broacast spectrum wireless operators. The American Federation of Musicians, the Recording Academy, SoundExchange and the Music Managers Forum say the auctions could raise billions of dollars in revenue for deficit reduction, as well free up spectrum for wireless broadband devices. Broadcasters that own television licenses want to choose whether they relinquish this spectrum, and want to be fully compensated for doing so.SoundExchange

But why are music industry interests speaking up regarding television spectrum? The Hill's "Hillicon Valley" blog put it simply: "Broadcasters and the music industry have a long-running feud over whether artists should receive royalties when radio stations play their songs."

The music industry groups say they are interested to "hasten the migration of music fans to cutting edge (wireless broadband) platforms that compensate artists," by paying royalties they say are a "basic economic and civil right for musicians."

The groups wrote, "It would seem to us that the NAB is not entitled to spectrum owned by the public, or costs associated with relinquishing it, and the federal government reclaiming this spectrum for purposes of deficit reduction is the kind of shared sacrifice that is required in these difficult times."

The NAB doesn't buy it. Spokesman Dennis Wharton fired back, "By coupling a TV spectrum issue with an unrelated performance tax on radio stations, the music industry sets the standard for grasping at straws. This is a Hail Mary pass that deserves to fall incomplete."NAB

Inside Radio believes the letter is part of a new music industry "tactic: find ways to make it difficult for broadcasters to do business such as by opposing license renewals.  The request to the Super Committee fits into that strategy, and similar moves are in the works, according to insiders who say bad feelings among many in the music community linger."

What's more, Inside Radio sees implications for online radio too. "As online streaming royalties grow bigger with each passing year, (NAB president Gordon) Smith believes webcast rates are likely to become intertwined with an on-air royalty issue," they write today. "Broadcasters’ current streaming royalty agreement with SoundExchange expires in 2015 yet Smith thinks there could be a way to resolve both the on-air and digital royalty issues sooner than that, potentially with something similar to a universal settlement. But with some broadcasters more digitally invested than others, radio’s internal royalty debate may once again break down between large and small market operators. Smith said he was optimistic that won’t happen, suggesting any new proposal would include an even more 'progressive system' where size dictates costs."

 
Read more from The Hill here. Subscribe to Inside Radio here.

TV-MAKERS TO DEFINE STANDARD FOR TV APPS

Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 12:00pm

LG, Sharp and Philips are “joining forces” to create a development kit for web-connected TV applications, essentially creating a common standard for developers. This is good news for anyone hoping to gain a presence on new Internet-connected TVs, including webcasters.

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