television

CBS leverages Radio.com to promote new television show with dedicated Net radio station

Monday, June 17, 2013 - 12:05pm

CBS Local Digital Media has created an Internet radio station based on the CBS Television series "Under the Dome."

The show premieres June 24, and is based upon the science fiction novel of the same name by Stephen King. The Internet radio station launched today on CBS's Radio.com.

CBS says the station's programming includes music "influenced by the show's characters, conversations with best-selling author and executive producer of the series Stephen King, weekly interviews with music supervisor Ann Kline, and an array of commentary surrounding each episode and how the plot is developing week to week."

Listen to the "Under the Dome" radio here.

Leaving apps behind, next-gen smart TVs will simply connect to Pandora's new "big screen" site

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 - 12:35pm

Today Pandora is available on more than 900 consumer electronics devices (besides computers, mobile phones, and tablets) like smart TVs, streaming media players, and home theater systems. To achieve this, the company has tasked an army of engineers to build the applications that run in each of these different environments.

Today Pandora revealed its new standards-based, HTML5 site for smart TVs, game consoles, and set-top boxes. CTO and EVP/Product Tom Conrad explained, "By using this platform, we can deliver a uniform experience across any standards-compliant TV, game console, or set top box and focus our efforts on end user benefits and innovation rather than platform specific details."

The site, tv.pandora.com, is optimized for a "10-foot experience," with navigation, controls, and display designed specifically for big screens. It's already running on the Xbox 360, will soon be available elsewhere as more vendors introduce standards-compliant (that is, which can handle HTML5) equipment.

Evolver.fm's Eliot Van Buskirk adds that an added benefit for Pandora might be that advertisers will pay more for ads with display elements that are pumped-up for the big screen. He also notes that people often have their best sound-reproducing equipment connected to the television.

Read more from Van Buskirk here. Pandora's Conrad blogged about tv.pandora.com here.

Despite buzz around streaming video, streaming audio reaches far and away more Americans weekly

Monday, February 11, 2013 - 12:15pm

While streaming video content is a hot topic, its reach among all adult age groups in the U.S. is dwarfed by streaming audio and radio content.

As you can see from the chart, 40% of 18-24s listen to streaming audio or radio weekly. That reach falls as subjects age, but is still a strong 1 in 4 35-54s.

Obviously, streaming audio is technically easier (with a lower bandwidth requirement). It's easier to enjoy audio on mobile platforms and while driving. And as MediaPost points out, "Radio and any other kind of streaming can be done on the computer while working on the same device -- whether for the purpose of providing background music, sports commentary or other forms of talk-based content."

Consultant Mark Ramsey commented, "For anyone who continues to chirp that 'Pandora is not radio,' I suggest you tell that to the advertiser who sees up to 40% reach on an ad-supported audio platform."

The study was conducted by USA TouchPoints. Read more in MediaPost here and Mark Ramsey here.

Nielsen buying Arbitron, also creating Twitter TV rating. Taylor asks, "How about for radio?"

Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 1:30pm

Nielsen and Twitter have forged a deal to create the "Nielsen Twitter TV ratings" to measure the total audience for social TV activity on the social media platform. Couple that with today's news that Nielsen is buying radio ratings leader Arbitron, and smart folks like Tom Taylor begin to ask, "Can radio be far behind?"

There's no real indication of such a development yet, but it's not hard to imageine that "a new radio morning show could be 'trending,' one of these days," suggests Taylor. Read more from him today here.

Read about Twitter TV ratings at LostRemote here and GigaOm here.

New Arbitron/comScore system's first task: Measuring ESPN's cross-platform audience

Thursday, September 13, 2012 - 12:20pm

While we were waiting for Arbitron to finally unveil their long-awaited unified on-air/online radio measurement (see RAIN here), they've announced a deal with comScore and ESPN to measure audio, video, and display across radio, tv, the web, and mobile.

The goal here is to create audience measurement using common metrics on a national and continuous basis, so content providers and marketers can gauge the reach, engagement, and cross-platform duplication of audience.

"The unprecedented size and scope of the project is being driven by the multiplatform measurement requirements of ESPN, which delivers video, audio and display content via television (both in-home and out-of-home), online and mobile video, PC web, mobile web, apps, tablets, digital audio and terrestrial radio" (see yesterday's top story in RAIN here), the companies' announcement read.

The initiative (characterized as "five-platform" as it separates "smartphones" adn "tablets") will integrate "the census and panel-based PC, mobile and TV set-top box measurement capabilities of comScore along with enhanced, single-source, multiplatform measurement capabilities of the Arbitron Portable People Meter (PPM) technology," according to the statement.

Though no roll-out date has been announced, ESPN, comScore and Arbitron will unveil more details October 1-3 at the upcoming Advertising Week convention in New York.

Read the press release here.

"Pandora and Spotify" part of U.S. online ad market's 2017 surge past TV, predicts Mintel

Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - 9:35am

This year, online will overtake newspapers' share of the global ad market. And in the U.S., digital ad dollars could surpass television by 2017.

Medialife Magazine reports on a new report from market research firm Mintel, writing, "Online's sharp growth curve, combined with slight declines for television, will continue to be sparked by new innovations, such as mobile advertising and increased use of online video streamed directly to television sets. The growth of online radio services, including Pandora and Spotify, will also bolster online ad sales, coming at the expense of terrestrial radio. And the continued shift in consumption of information on digital devices rather than in print will prompt many advertisers to move their money out of newspapers and magazines and put it online."

Meanwhile, media agency Carat says online will overtake newspapers in the global ad market this year (they had earlier predicted it would happen next year). Digital will account for 15.3% of all spending in 2012, second only to television. Newspapers will account for 14.4%, says Carat.

Read more on these developments from Medialife Magazine here and here.

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