teens

Study: Just 3% of UK teens pick "radio" for favorite way to consume audio

Wednesday, July 3, 2013 - 10:35am

Radio is far-and-away the preferred device for audio consumption among UK adults who are also Internet users. That's anything but true for the 15-19 age cohort however.

A May 2013 study from Audiometrics indicates 35% of UK Internet users overall chose radio as their favorite platform for "listening to audio." That's more than twice the second-favorite, "computer/laptop" (16%).

Yet merely 3% of teens picked radio as their favorite. Smartphone/mobile phone (36%) and iPod/MP3 player (35%) were the big winners with teens.

Note that there's nothing in this report about actual content -- and it's likely that a good number of these teens who seem to be abandoning radio as a device may still avidly consume streaming content from local or national broadcasters.

EMarketer estimates "81% of (UK) teen mobile phone users (ages 12 to 17) will use a smartphone this year, and that percentage will rise to 96% by 2017."

Read more in eMarketer here.

Experts warn radio the time to bring in younger demos is now

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 - 6:20pm

Fred Jacobs and Jerry Del Colliano both note this week that radio's "systemic" ambivalence towards the younger set will likely eventually have disastrous results for AM/FM radio.

Jacobs actually refers to "Generation Z's" (today's under-18s), Del Colliano "Millennials" (young adults), but they make a similar point: "When radio loses generations of listeners, its relevance in the world of media options is going to be called into question," Jacobs wrote in his JacoBlog. Del Colliano says what most broadcasters are doing now, in terms of attracting younger demos, is a "losing formula... driving the essential next generation away from radio."

So, what do broadcasters need to do?

"If you want to know what you’ll be doing in a couple of years or so, study teens," Jacobs wrote. To illustrate, he cites the increasingly popular Snapchat photo/social platform -- mostly ignored by radio.

On his Inside Music Media blog, Del Colliano cranked out ten action steps for broadcasters to better speak to teens and young adults, including reformulating the approach towards "morning shows," reinventing radio's "formatics," and building content designed around a "two minutes or less" attention span.

"Fix what's on the air, buy more years and then personally escort your newfound Millennial listeners to your next business -- digital content," he advised.

Jacobs concludes: "Because if you don’t do the research and take the time to listen and learn from Gen Z, you lose powerful insights into what may be right around the corner – your corner."

Read Fred Jacbos' JacoBlog here, and register for Inside Music Media here.

Pew study shows 25% of teens go online via smartphones

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 1:35pm

A new Pew Internet & American Life Project study called "Teens and Technology 2013" says one-quarter of U.S. teens access the Internet mostly via smartphone. Just 15% of of those 18+ do the same.

More than a third of Americans age 12-17 say they own a smartphone device, up from 23% in 2011. And while teen girls are just as likely as boys to have a smartphone, 34% use them on the Web (compared to 24% of boys).

Pew says the teen "cell-mostly" Internet population could mean a surge of mobile Internet use in the near future.

Read Washington Post coverage here.

If a U.S. teen has a mobile device, chances are it's a smartphone

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 - 11:40am

According to Nielsen research, as of July, 74% of 25-34 year old mobile customers now own smartphones, a surge from last year's 59% for that group.

However, the most dramatic increase of smartphone penetration was among teenage (13-17) mobile customers, with the majority (58%) now owning a smartphone. That figure was just 36% a year ago.

"Among most age groups smartphones represent the majority of U.S. mobile subscribers, but American teens were the age group adopting smartphones the fastest," said Nielsen analyst Nichole Henderson in a press release. "As teens increase in their share of smartphone owners, mobile carriers and manufacturers should consider how to market to this growing group."

Overall, 55.5% of U.S. mobile subscribers own smartphones, up from 41% a year previous.

The graph, and press release, are from Nielsen, here.

Press coverage of Beloit Mindset List implies 18 year-olds have no concept of radio

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 12:05pm

The annual "Beloit College Mindset List" is out, and press coverage of it seems to portray radio as a long-forgotten relic of which today's 18 year-olds have no concept.

The Mindset List is created by two Beloit College professors each year, and it's intended to compile "the cultural touchstones that shape the lives of students entering college this fall." This year's list includes the item "15. Having grown up with MP3s and iPods, they never listen to music on the car radio and really have no use for radio at all."

Now the list is quite usually pretty over-dramatic, as we think it is here. Taken literally, this list of items would portray today's college freshman of not only not consciously remembering a time when Robert DeNiro played Vito Corleone (from "The Godfather II"), but as having no concept of it. And, obviously, when it comes to radio, that's simply not true. While we continue to believe that radio listening patterns are changing (and dramatically so), the idea that young adults "really have no use for radio at all" seems pretty far-fetched. A quick look at Arbitron will show that while the amount of time young people spend with broadcast radio is declining, radio is still present in their lives.

But the coverage the Mindset List is getting seems to focus on this point that portrays radio as a relic. It reminds us of a recent blog by Jacobs Media president Fred Jacobs here. We agree with Fred, and continue to maintain that radio is best-positioned to transition the medium into the future. Today's broadcasters have the content, the talent, the expertise, and now the technology to maintain their dominance as radio expands its platform, and remain relevant for generations of incoming college freshmen.

Plus, if college kids don't know radio, there'd be no college radio station! Where will the musicheads work? The college ISP?

Read the Mindset List here.

U.S. teens' top music source: YouTube, says Nielsen

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - 1:15pm

The new Music 360 study from Nielsen shows that in the U.S. "more teens listen to music through YouTube than through any other source (64%), followed by radio (56%) and iTunes (53% ) and CDs (50%)." 

Nearly half (48%) of Americans says they use radio most often to discover new music.

More than half (54%) said they have music player apps on their smartphones, followed closely by radio apps (47%).

Read more from Nielsen on Music 360 here.

Syndicate content