talk

New iHeartRadio Talk includes customizable channel "Daily Pulse"

Wednesday, July 24, 2013 - 12:35pm

Clear Channel today beta launched iHeartRadio Talk, a platform that offers on-demand professional and listener-created talk content -- which the company calls "audiosodes" -- through a partnership with Spreaker.

The centerpiece of the new system is called "Daily Pulse." This is a customizable channel of talk content with news and "culture highlights," to which listeners can add their favorite content.

The Spreaker partnership licenses that company's technology to enables users to capture, process, and upload their own created audio content to iHeartRadio Talk. An editorial staff will run a "quality control" on submitted content.

Featured exclusive iHeartRadio Talk content will sourced from The Huffington Post, Ryan Seacrest, Univision, and The Wall Street Journal. Clear Channel says iHeartRadio Talk will be the exclusive digital radio platform for ABC's "Good Morning America," "Jimmy Kimmel Live," and "The View."

TechCrunch also covers the launch here.

Robertson's UberTalk gives an "on-demand feel" to political, sports, and music programs

Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 6:55pm

Serial entrepreneur (and frequent RAIN Summit speaker) Michael Robertson (MP3Tunes, DAR.fm) has launched UberTalk, a portal for online talk radio designed to allow listeners to find the content they like, regardless of its originating broadcaster.

"My premise is radio stations are a quaint artifact of regional spectrum licensing which made sense when slicing up AM/FM spectrum," an arrangement which "makes little sense on the world wide web. A more logical way of looking at radio would be to focus on the content which is what attracts people," Robertson said today.

So, instead of sorting and searching by station, UberTalk steers users to find the programs they like, with a design that mimics the television "EPG," or electronic program guide. Listeners can find shows through the popularity-based rankings, or by category (sports, politics, etc.) and tune in instantly (via the site HTML5 player) to any show currently airing on any of thousands of radio stations.

Robertson explains, "Due to rebroadcasts and time zone shifts this means that many popular shows are available all throughout the day making radio programs more on-demand feeling." To listen to shows that are not currently airing, UberTalk uses time-shifting functionality from Robertson's DAR.fm.

Try UberTalk here

Radical.fm "alpha testing" new HTML5 interface; promises "personalities and local content" on Net radio with new TALK tech

Friday, August 10, 2012 - 11:30am

Swedish webcaster Radical.fm has launched an pre-release "alpha test" HTML5 version of its service for the web, with mobile apps in development.

The new HTML5 service is available to music industry professionals, journalists, and bloggers by invitation only. HTML5 is the newest iteration of "markup" language for the web, and integrates audio and video streams (as opposed to requiring an external application like Flash).

The Radical suite of online music services includes what it calls "passive stations" (which Radical compares to Pandora), "active playlists (like Spotify)," and a "personal broadcast" service called RadCast (which "makes every listener the owner of a broadcast radio station and permits personal streams to be shared in real-time").

Regarding RadCast, Radical founder/CEO Thomas McAlevey says in his company's press release, "Soon we will release TALK (in a Public Beta) giving users worldwide the ability to interject live audio for hosting music and talk shows, conducting interviews, and maybe toppling a dictatorship or two. The last bastion of old-fashioned radio – personalities and local content – is about to fall."

Radical invites artists to upload their material for streaming on the service, and now integrates SoundCloud to make that process easier.

Read Radical's press release here. Watch for a full review of Radical.fm in RAIN soon.

RTDNA survey: Majority of stations unsure if website profitable or not

Thursday, August 2, 2012 - 11:35am

Profitability over time chartThough nearly all news radio stations now offer a website, just over half do not offer streaming audio, fewer than one in four stations have a mobile app and a majority of NDs/GMs don't know if the website is profitable or not. Those are just some of the findings from the Radio Television Digital News Association's 2012 TV and Radio News Staffing and Profitability Survey.

The survey found that overall, more than 96% of news radio stations have a website. About 80% of the websites offer local news, down 3% from last year (and compared to 100% of TV station websites that offer local news). Just under 50% feature streaming audio, 61% audio, 15.3% "live newscasts," 32.1% "recorded newscasts" and 26.7% podcasts (the survey does not go into detail about what the differences are between some of these categories). The most popular website offerings are text (86%) and pictures (64%). Interestingly, 28.2% offer news video.

Stations said that about 25% of their web content is "web-only." 6.5% of content is user-generated.

As for mobile, the fastest-growing segment for Internet radio in general, only 24.1% of stations offer a mobile app. And 10.7% of stations say they offer mobile-releated content on their websites.

RTDNA's survey also found that the average number of radio employees working on the website was 1.8 (that's 0.8 full-time and 1.0 part-time). Both figures are down from last year. But 67.8% of stations said other staffers help out on the website. About one in five news directors said they were in charge overall of the website, 55% said they were in charge of news content only and just under 17% said they had no management role.

RTDNAAbout 60% of station GMs/NDs weren't sure if the website was profitable or not. Aproximately 13% said the site was profitable, another 13% said it was breaking even and around 15% said it was operating at a loss. "Radio profitability numbers are all about 3% worse than a year ago," writes the RTDNA.

As for how many people are visiting radio station websites, "radio web traffic numbers are still reported by too few news directors to be viewed as reliable." The RTDNA was able to put together overall radio website traffic figures though: 917,500 pageviews and 151,900 unique visitors over the past 30 days. Page views have doubled, but unique visitors are down 25% from last year.

You can find the RTDNA's results here (PDF). This is the fourth part of the RTDNA's 2012 TV and Radio News Staffing and Profitability Survey and was conducted by Bob Papper.

Personalized news radio service Stitcher launches "Election Center"

Thursday, May 3, 2012 - 12:05pm

Stitcher's Election CenterStitcher, the radio service often referred to as "Pandora for news radio," has created an Election Center for the 2012 campaigns. It serves as a hub for news from sources like Slate, CBS News and others.

Plus, TechCrunch reports Stitcher is "also using the Election Center to test out some new technology. Every piece of content is automatically transcribed and analyzed, then used to create a list of trending topics across all of Stitcher’s election content. So you can see what the current hot topics are, look at how many times they’ve been mentioned, and then dive into a specific piece of related content."

You can find TechCrunch's coverage here.

 

Krasiniski leaves Arbitron; LDR adds N/T vet Hobbs; Pandora names Shapiro for political ads

Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - 11:00am

Arbitron SVP/Digital Media & Analytics Paul Krasinski has announced his exit from the company, and he's reportedly "headed for a social media company." In January 2011, Krasinski (right), then COO at Ando Media, joined Arbitron to lead the company's digital development. Arbitron is planning a return to online radio metrics with the launch of its "Total Audience Measurement" system.

Meanwhile, Listener Driven Radio has named Gabe Hobbs Strategic Advisor. Hobbs has more than 20 years experience in news, talk, and sports programming (1998-2008 he ran Clear Channel’s 275 news, talk, and sports stations). Listener Driven Radio recently launched its "Topic Pulse" service, which scans all available news sources, local blogs, Facebook posts, Tweets, and other social media so producers and talent can monitor topics and stories "getting buzz" in a market.

Finally, Pandora has named Rena Shapiro as Director of Political Advertising Sales. Shapiro (left), who was director/political and issue advocacy accounts at AOL, also helped create Google's political ad business. Last fall Pandora unveiled a new targeted ad product for political candidates and special interest groups, which targets listeners based on ZIP Code.

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