smartphones

Music listening the fastest-growing mobile usage category, comScore finds

Friday, August 3, 2012 - 1:10pm

Mobile musicNew quarterly figures from comScore show 27.6% of mobile subscribers listen to music on their mobile devices. That's up 2.3% from March to June, making it the fastest-growing usage category tracked by comScore.

That said, it's still the least popular activity, coming in behind items like downloading apps (51.4%), playing games (33.4%) and texting (75%).

ComScore also found that the mobile market is more or less divided between Apple and Google. Overall, 47% of the U.S. population now owns a smartphone and 234 million Americans use mobile devices.

TechCrunch has more coverage here.

Jacobs Media survey: "High-tech revolution continues" for public radio audience

Monday, July 30, 2012 - 12:55pm

Media usage stats from PRTS4Jacobs Media's fourth annual survey of public radio listeners shows "the high-tech revolution continues," with big growth for mobile device ownership, the use of Internet radio, social networks and other digital services.

The fourth Public Radio Techsurvey (PRTS) found that nearly half (46%) of respondents listen to Internet radio weekly or more. That's up 16% from PRTS3, which was released in early 2011 (RAIN coverage here). Moreover, 18% use Pandora weekly or more (up 17% from PRTS3), while 14% use SiriusXM (up 5%). As for AM/FM, 87% say they listen to at least one hour per day. That's down 2% from PRTS3. 

More than half (52%) of public radio listeners said they own a smartphone -- a growth of 50% from PRTS3. Of those folks, more than 90% download apps. A little under a third of respondents (30%) own a tablet (up 407%). Of those who don't, 37% said they are very or somewhat likely to buy one this year.

Around half say they are able to connect a smartphone or mp3 player to their car and nearly 10% own a car with a "digital dashboard" like Ford's SYNC. That's a desirable platform for web radio -- and a dangerous one for AM/FM to lose -- as 41% of respondents say they do the majority of their radio listening in cars.

PRTS4Jacobs Media's study found "spectacular growth" in Twitter usage, with 18% of respondents using the service. That's up 57% from the previous study. A little over six in ten respondents (63%) have a Facebook profile. All told, 70% of respondents use social media in some way, up from 64% in 2010.

"The data from PRTS4 continues to point to the public radio audience rapidly using new media and gadgets in the pursuit of informing themselves," said Jacobs Media president Fred Jacobs. "Station programmers and managers would do well to better understand the fast rate of adoption, and shape content offerings accordingly."

The fourth-annual PRTS involved 49 public radio stations across the U.S. and more than 30,700 respondents. You can find more information from Jacobs Media here.

European webcaster Aupeo! launches Windows Phone app

Friday, July 27, 2012 - 12:20pm

Aupeo on Windows Phone 7Berlin-based Internet radio service Aupeo! has launched an app for Windows Phone devices. The app offers access to the service's hundreds of genre-, mood- and artist-based customizable radio streams.

"It's a well designed app, and one we believe is well worth checking out," writes WPCentral (here).

You can find more from Aupeo here.

If you're interested in finding out more about Aupeo, the company's CEO Holger Weiss will be a panelist at our upcoming RAIN Summit Europe. Click here to find out more.

 

Lifehacker offers tips on how to (cheaply) integrate a smartphone into your car

Wednesday, July 25, 2012 - 11:30am

Car stereo of todayNew cars have a myriad of ways to connect to your smartphone and play web radio, but if your vehicle is even just a few years old, you may not have all the bells and whistles needed. How to connect your smartphone to a "dumb" car stereo?

Lifehacker offers some tips, pointing out some cheap USB adapters, clever tricks and even handy office supplies that can help make your car smartphone-friendly. Or, if you're feeling crafty, you could always turn your ashtray into a makeshift smartphone dock (RAIN coverage here).

Here's a preview that may put a chill down some radio folks' spines: to get the best reception out of an FM transmitter connected to your smartphone, Lifehacker suggests removing your car antenna! Though with apps from TuneIn or iHeartRadio installed, maybe that's not such a big deal...

Find Lifehacker's tips here.

Arbiton Mobile and iResearch to open mobile research service in China

Wednesday, July 18, 2012 - 1:20pm

Mobile consumer in ChinaArbitron Mobile and iResearch Consulting have partnered to operate a mobile media research service in China, the world's largest smartphone market.

The companies hope to provide marketers, content providers, app developers and wireless services with information about how mobile consumers in China use apps, engage in advertising and generally use their devices. Arbitron and iResearch will create a panel of around 10,000 people who will install special tracking software on their smartphones and tablets.

You can find the companies' press release here.

Mobile and web radio listening growing strongly among women, Alan Burns & Associates study finds

Friday, July 13, 2012 - 12:00pm

Stats from Alan Burns & Associates new study of women radio listenersOverall radio listening isn't decreasing, according to new research, it's just migrating to the Internet and especially to mobile devices. A study by Alan Burns and Associates of more than 2,000 female radio listeners, aged 15-54, found that daily listening to AM/FM radio -- no matter the device -- is up around 2% year-over-year.

Looking deeper into the numbers though, daily listening to AM/FM on a radio is down 24% year-over-year, while listening to AM/FM online is up 282% and listening on a mobile device grew a whopping 750%.

In other words, increases in digital radio listening are apparently more than making up for traditional radio listening's lost ground. Those gains might be larger if one were to include web-only music streams, which nearly half of those surveyed said they listen to at least weekly.

However, AM/FM listening on radios remains a juggernaut: 86.6% of the women surveyed said they listen to AM/FM on a radio on a weekly basis. And listening to AM/FM on a radio is still more than twice that of listening to AM/FM via the web and on mobile devices combined.

Alan Burns & AssociatesBut online, "custom music streams" are slightly more popular than AM/FM simulcasts among the women surveyed: around 49% of those surveyed said they listened to cusom music streams on a weekly basis (up from 39% in 2011), compared to around 43% who said they listened to AM/FM web simulcasts on a weekly basis (up from 34% in 2011).

The fastest growing area, unsurprisingly, appears to be mobile. Nearly 50% of the women surveyed said they had downloaded a radio app and 26.2% listen to mobile radio at least weekly (up from 15.4% in 2011). And time spent listening to AM/FM on a mobile device reportedly grew around 400% year-over-year.

Just under half of those surveyed agreed with the statement, "I can foresee a day when I won’t need or want to listen to music on radio because I can get it online and/or on my phone," (compared to around 37% who agreed with the statement in 2011).

You can find the results from Alan Burns and Associates' study ("Here She Comes 2012 - Insights Into Women, Radio, and New Media") right here (PDF).

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