radio

Pandora claims 6.13% of U.S. radio listening; 22.6% of 18+ in Media Audit markets listen monthly

Monday, August 6, 2012 - 12:45pm

Pandora says its July numbers show it now claims a 6.13% share of total U.S. radio listening. The leading webcaster streamed 1.2 billion hours of content last month to an active audience that grew to nearly 55 million by month's end.

It's an impressive comparison to July 2011's figures. Then, Pandora streamed 637 million hours (which means they're up 76% in the last year) to 37 million active listeners (so, a 48% increase), representing 3.51% of total U.S. radio listening.

Interestingly, audience survey firm The Media Audit on Friday issued a correction to its recently reported Pandora estimates (which were reported in RAIN here). They reported Pandora's current total reach as 11.3% with adults 18+. As it turns out, the company didn't ask survey respondents about Pandora in 20 of the 81 markets it studies. So, when only those 61 markets in which Pandora usage was measured are tabulated, its shows "Pandora's reach among adults within The Media Audit's 61 measured markets to be 22.6%, and represents more than 30.7 million unique monthly users within that same footprint."

Salt Lake City was Pandora's top market among those The Media Audit surveyed, showing almost 32% of its 18+ population having logged onto Pandora in the typical month. SLC tops Boston (30.7%), Atlanta (30.3%), San Diego (28.8%), and Charleston (27.9%).

Read Pandora's press release here; The Media Audit's correction here.

RTDNA survey: Majority of stations unsure if website profitable or not

Thursday, August 2, 2012 - 11:35am

Profitability over time chartThough nearly all news radio stations now offer a website, just over half do not offer streaming audio, fewer than one in four stations have a mobile app and a majority of NDs/GMs don't know if the website is profitable or not. Those are just some of the findings from the Radio Television Digital News Association's 2012 TV and Radio News Staffing and Profitability Survey.

The survey found that overall, more than 96% of news radio stations have a website. About 80% of the websites offer local news, down 3% from last year (and compared to 100% of TV station websites that offer local news). Just under 50% feature streaming audio, 61% audio, 15.3% "live newscasts," 32.1% "recorded newscasts" and 26.7% podcasts (the survey does not go into detail about what the differences are between some of these categories). The most popular website offerings are text (86%) and pictures (64%). Interestingly, 28.2% offer news video.

Stations said that about 25% of their web content is "web-only." 6.5% of content is user-generated.

As for mobile, the fastest-growing segment for Internet radio in general, only 24.1% of stations offer a mobile app. And 10.7% of stations say they offer mobile-releated content on their websites.

RTDNA's survey also found that the average number of radio employees working on the website was 1.8 (that's 0.8 full-time and 1.0 part-time). Both figures are down from last year. But 67.8% of stations said other staffers help out on the website. About one in five news directors said they were in charge overall of the website, 55% said they were in charge of news content only and just under 17% said they had no management role.

RTDNAAbout 60% of station GMs/NDs weren't sure if the website was profitable or not. Aproximately 13% said the site was profitable, another 13% said it was breaking even and around 15% said it was operating at a loss. "Radio profitability numbers are all about 3% worse than a year ago," writes the RTDNA.

As for how many people are visiting radio station websites, "radio web traffic numbers are still reported by too few news directors to be viewed as reliable." The RTDNA was able to put together overall radio website traffic figures though: 917,500 pageviews and 151,900 unique visitors over the past 30 days. Page views have doubled, but unique visitors are down 25% from last year.

You can find the RTDNA's results here (PDF). This is the fourth part of the RTDNA's 2012 TV and Radio News Staffing and Profitability Survey and was conducted by Bob Papper.

NewOrleansReporter.org to deliver in-depth local coverage to web, mobile, and radio

Friday, July 27, 2012 - 12:20pm

NPR announced today its involvement with a new University of New Orleans venture to create a "multimedia newsroom" for in-depth local news for the Crescent City.

NewOrleansReporter.org will be a news website and mobile platform, with a presence on WWNO radio, the public station owned and operated by the university. It will reportedly be run by a staff of 10 to 20 producing news for the web, tablet, smart phone, social media, and radio. The site will also feature and link to other local, national and world news.

NPR, which is consulting WWNO on tech infrastructure and online revenue generation, says it hopes to have the new site live by year's end.

As an "open source," operation, all of NewOrleansReporter's content will be available for free to other local and national news outlets. In fact, the operation's success will be measured in part by how much of its content gets "picked up" elsewhere.

New Orleans, no stranger to hardship, will soon be the largest city in the U.S. without a daily print newspaper. The Times-Picayune announced earlier this year that it will print just three days a week beginning in fall.

"What we are seeing play out in New Orleans, with the Times-Picayune, is a scene we have seen repeated over and over in a lot of communities as newspapers have fallen on hard times," NPR EVP/chief content officer Kinsey Wilson told The Wall Street Journal. "[Newspapers'] weakening and sometimes collapse is leaving communities with a real information deficit. In broad terms, we have seen this as being an opportunity for public radio to be one of the emerging players, as the news business is rebuilt." (RAIN readers may remember Wilson as the keynote speaker at RAIN Summit West in 2010.)

NPR's press release explains, "The objective of the University and its partners is to create a strong, sustainable model for nonprofit, multimedia journalism that will serve the greater New Orleans area as an open source of trustworthy news and information for decades to come."

Read Wall Street Journal coverage here.

Edison pres embraces the new tech that represents radio's consumption growth these days

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - 12:20pm

Those broadcasters who feel a need to reserve the term "radio" for over-the-air AM/FM signals received by a box on a nightstand or car stereo are actually missing out: they're missing out on the chance to show that radio is "very much a healthy, thriving, and growing medium."

That's an important point Edison Research's Larry Rosin gets across in his guest post in Jacobs Media's blog today. By cordoning themselves off in a strictly "AM/FM" world, some of these broadcasters are defining themselves by a medium that's no longer the dominant force it's been for decades. But when one considers all these other new technology delivery mechanisms "radio," it's clear that "radio is booming. When one thinks of all of radio, I have to believe there is more consumption than at any time in history," Rosin writes.

Rosin, Edison cofounder and president, encourages the industry to abandon the view that radio is limited to AM/FM delivery (which dooms it to a gradual slide from preeminence), and let on-air take its place among the variety of audio content delivery media. A good step in that direction, he argues, is to get behind Arbitron's efforts in building an "all radio" ratings system.

"In the UK, where all forms of radio are measured together, this assertion has already been made. As I travel around the globe I generally hear nothing but optimism about the medium and its expansion in creativity and influence."

Read Rosin in JacoBlog here.

BIA/Kelsey expects online/digital to make up 25% of local ad market

Tuesday, July 17, 2012 - 12:00pm

BIA/Kelsey expects a 11.7% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for radio's local online revenue in the 2011-2016 period. While television's local online revenue will grow a little more quickly (almost 13% CAGR), both trounce newspaper's (5%).

The firm also expects local ad revenues in the "online/interactive/digital" category to grow more than 13% this year, pushing the digital category past the 25% mark in the local ad market.

Probably not surprisingly, the "star" categories in BIA/Kelsey's new "U.S. Local Media Forecast (2011-2016)" are mobile, social media, and online video. The analysts expect the local mobile search segment to grow 77% this year, local online video about 52%, and social media 26%.

A summary of the report is here; purchase the full report here.

Try this at home: Bringing a 1934 radio back to life

Friday, July 6, 2012 - 11:20am

For Friday/weekend fun, take a look at this 1934 Simplex Model P radio that a radio enthusiast "refurbed."

We're no electronics experts here, but it looks like some great Depression-era "tubes & wires porn," if that's your thing! But the end result, say, getting to hear "Call Me Maybe" through a box that looks like it fell off Tom Joad's wagon, may not actually be worth all the trouble.

In which case, we'd like to point you back to an earlier story in RAIN, here, which shows how to install an Android smartphone in an FM radio to make it an Internet "receiver."

Read (and see) lots more J.W. Koebel's blog here. H/T to HackaDay.com here.

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