playlist

MS, Spotify, The Echo Nest create visually-oriented playlist creation tool

Tuesday, March 26, 2013 - 12:10pm

The expert DJ knows the power of not only playing the right songs, but in the right order to create flow. Microsoft and Spotify have teamed with music intelligence firm The Echo Nest and created a visual tool to sort music playlists based on the songs' characteristics.

It's called Mixshape. It uses Spotify's music library, The Echo Nest's database of music data, and is built for Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system's and Internet Explorer 10 web browser's touch-screen interface.

Playlist curators manipulate shapes on the screen to manage the tempo of the song flow. The shapes are arranged in song order, with different colors to represent key, shapes for "feel," and speed of the animation represents tempo and energy. When the playlist has been properly shaped, it can be exported to Spotify, where it can be played and shared via social media.

MixShape launched today in the UK, but should be accessible in all of Spotify's markets.

The Echo Nest CEO Jim Lucchese will take part in the "Accelerating Your Audience Growth" panel at RAIN Summit West April 7 in Las Vegas. Spotify VP/West Coast Ad Sales Michael Jackel will speak on the "Jump Start Your Revenue" panel. More details (and registration link) here.

Read more about Mixshape at TheNextWeb here; also in The Echo Nest's blog here. The Mixshape site is here.

Webcaster Songza comes to Canada; available on Sonos devices now too

Thursday, August 9, 2012 - 1:20pm

The webcast service Songza, known for its "music concierge" interface that offers playlists based on the time of day and your likely activities, launched in Canada this week. The free service is now available to Canadians on the Web, Apple and Android mobile, plus home streaming device Sonos (see below).

Though the Internet is a global marketplace, many webcast services aren't available outside their home country due to the difficulty in negotiating licensing with copyright owners around the world.

Songza worked with Canada's music licensing company Re:Sound to secure the necessary licenses to stream to a Canadian audience (an audience, by the way, with a significantly high broadband and smartphone penetration, as well as the relative lack of other streaming options).

Sonos owners (that includes those in the U.S. as well) can now access Songza on their devices, and "Songza's music concierge goes a step further so that you can choose a playlist based on rooms in your home."

By the way, Sonos has also announced availability of Amazon's new Cloud Player music storage service on the device.

Forbes sees emotion- and activity-based playlist service Stereomood as Pandora with feelings

Friday, December 2, 2011 - 11:00am

When it comes to passion and emotion, do we just leave it to the Italians?

StereomoodThis week Forbes covers Stereomood, an online radio service based in Rome. As opposed to clinical musical genres, Stereomood is designed to create a listening experience based on your state of emotion. Forbes contributor Daniel Papalia (see?) writes, "Where Pandora is omniscient and calculating, working to crack songs like codes or pretty algorithms, Stereomood is malleable and sensual."

Stereomood (which we covered in February, here) uses song links from blogs and creates playlists based on mood or activity. The user picks a suitable tag on the website, based on what they're doing or how they're feeling. Since it's based on music blogs, unsurprisingly, "playlists skew towards the indie and under the radar. Major label acts are represented, but sparingly," Papalia writes. 

"By carnally and spiritually (Mama mia!) arranging songs, the site erodes all prior notions of genre, desegregating and humanizing music," he continues. "Tracks from different eras and opposite hemispheres peacefully mingle, united by feeling and human activity – the purest and simplest of measures."

Read more on Stereomood in Forbes here.

 

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