online-only

Local media personalities to host Boston Herald Radio, which leverages paper's journalism resources

Monday, July 29, 2013 - 1:10pm

One week from today the Boston Herald will launch its own live (weekdaily 6a-6p) news and talk online radio station.

Boston Herald Radio will focus on news, talk, and sports for the Boston area, leveraging the journalism and technology of the major daily newspaper. Former Boston-area radio and television personalities like Jeff Katz, Jon Meterparel, Jen Royle, and Michael Graham will host daily shows. Herald reporters and editors will provide news throughout the day. Other elements from the newspaper (reviews, political and business reports, style and food segments, and pro, college, and high school sports) will be featured as well, reports Talkers Magazine.

[Pictured is Herald Editor-in-Chief Joe Sciacca (left) and Herald COO Jeff Magram in the new Boston Herald Radio studio.]

Rival paper The Boston Globe owns the online alternative rock music-centric RadioBDC, operated by former WFNX staffers (RAIN coverage here). (WFNX.com was an online-only station operated by the Phoenix Media/Communications Group in conjunction with alternative media newspaper the Boston Phoenix (see RAIN here). The paper and the station both shut down in March.)

Boston Herald Radio will use Backbone Radio technology, including its "Talk Radio" multi-line Internet-based phone system. The system allows for multi-caller and screening capability anywhere an Internet connection is available (meaning, outside the studio).

Talkers Magazine quotes Boston Herald publisher and president Patrick J. Purcell: "Internet radio is exploding and it makes sense that the Herald rounds out our multimedia platform with talk radio programming. It's perfect synergy."

Boston Herald Radio will be available on the newspaper's website, TuneIn Radio (site and apps), and via dedicated mobile apps.

See Talkers Magazine's coverage here. Read more from the Herald itself here.

Pew Research writes "Digital Drives Listener Experience" for radio

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 1:00pm

As "technology is turning what we once thought of as radio into something broader -- listening" (as Pew wrote in 2006), online-only and satellite radio (while still a small share of overall radio revenue) have the more positive financial forecasts for the long-term.

That's from an overview essay of the "audio" section of the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism new annual report on the state of the news media. The essay is called "Audio: Digital Drives Listener Experience." (While the study focuses mostly on news content, it certainly isn't limited to that, discussing Pandora, Spotify, and the Intenret radio Fairness Act, among other topics.)

Pew also concluded that NPR "may have positioned itself for the digital age better than other news radio." On-air listening declines as NPR may very well be partially the result of robust digital offerings on the web, podcasts, and mobile apps.

One digital platform that's failing is HD Radio. Now, more stations are actually dropping their HD signal than are adopting the technology, and there are fewer HD signals on the air than a year ago.

See more of the Pew study here. There are more charts from the paper here.

WXPN launches "Singer Songwriter Radio" online

Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 12:05pm

Philadelphia non-commercial adult rock station WXPN has launced the new "Singer Songwriter Radio" on its XPN2.org stream, which had been its online-only alternative/indie music stream.

"Hosted by WXPN DJs, including Michaela Majoun, Helen Leicht and Dan Reed the playlist includes music by both heritage and new artists, as well as exclusive in-studio performances," according to the press release. The channel will include programs like "World Cafe," "Mountain Stage," "Folkadelphia," "Folk Alley."

XPN's "Folk Alley" stream, by the way, is still operational, as is its "XPoNential radio" stream (here).

There may be two, competing "FNX-online" streams in Boston

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 - 12:10pm

Yesterday we reported Boston.com's announcement that it would launch an Internet radio stream for alternative rock fans when WFNX changes format next month (please see our coverage here). Now, Phoenix Media Group (which is selling the station to Clear Channel) CEO Stephen Mindich says he plans to do the same thing!

Inside Radio says Mindich announced his plan to launch an online alt-rock stream "just hours after the Boston Globe went public." Tom Taylor on Radio-Info reports Mindich "is surprised and not too pleased" about Boston.com's announcement. According to Taylor, the sale of the station "leaves him with the intellectual property of the station he founded 29 years ago." Of course, as we reported yesterday, WFNX PD Paul Driscoll and several FNX on-air personalities (plus sales, operations and promotions vets from the station) will be part of Boston.com's station.

From Inside Radio: "Mindich says the online station will not only retain the FNX branding but also the alt-rocker’s 'unique, independent spirit.' The station has begun promoting the webcast on-air."

Read more in Taylor on Radio-Info here; subscribe to Inside Radio here.

Triton's Agovino says customizable pureplay programming more compelling than simple simulcasts

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - 12:00pm

The 826 million hours of online radio listening Triton Digital Media tallied in September is 20% more than January's total. And while listening to broadcast radio simulcast online is indeed growing, it's the huge gains made by Pandora (and, to a much lesser extent, other "pureplay" Internet radio outlets) that's powering that growth.

As a matter of fact, two years ago, 70% of online listening Triton measured was credited to simulcast streams of broadcast radio. As of September's numbers, it's online-only radio that accounts for 70%. During those two years, Pandora saw its AQH (note: we're switching here to the AQH number) more than quintuple from 147,673 in September, 2009  (Mo-Su 6a-12M)  to 752,816 in September, 2011.

[Take a look at the chart on the right. The "outlier" is Pandora. A larger and easier-to-read-sized graph is here. Also, see RAIN's coverage of the September 2011 Triton Digital Webcast Metrics ratings here.]

Mike AgovinoTriton Digital COO Mike Agovino thinks pureplay outlets that allow the listener to influence the music they hear have a clear advantage over basic online simulcasts here. "The broadcast simulcast model does not translate online, where you have so much choice, so much less clutter and the opportunity to customize the experience," Agovino explained, as reported by Inside Radio today. "Broadcasters need to look at how to take the best of their brand experience over the air... and combine it with more choice, less clutter and the ability to customize the content."
 
And, like most things, the best time for broadcasters to start enhancing their online offerings would be "now." Inside Radio writes, "Depending on the market and demographic, the online audience can represent 3%-10% of overall listening for a radio station, Triton says. The company expects that percentage to hit an inflection point within the next 12-18 months with a double-digit percentage of demographics under 40 that will fuel more growth for the space."

Subscribe to Inside Radio here.

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