online

Internet increases lead over radio, print for U.S. fans' sports media consumption, says study

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - 12:50pm

The proportion of U.S. sports fans that follow games and teams on smartphones and tablets has grown from 21% to 35% since 2011. Twenty-three percent of them say they watch video via mobile devices. This growth is apparently coming at the expense of radio and print sports media consumption, according to a study released today. 

Sporting News Media has released the third edition of its annual survey of sports media consumption in the U.S., based on online surveys of one thousand U.S. adults.

The Internet, in fact, is easily the second-most popular way to consume sports content (behind television) -- "now considerably ahead of print" (to quote the Sporting News press release) which, along with radio, has declined in usage for sports in the last two years.

See Sporting News' infographic based on the study's findings here. The press release is here. (h/t to Tom Taylor Now, who also reports on this study today)

Studies: Nearly half of UK adults listen online weekly; more than 1/3 of all UK radio listening via digital platforms

Thursday, June 13, 2013 - 12:55pm

A new service in the UK called Audiometrics says 48% of adults in that country listen to audio or radio online weekly -- that's 25 million age 15+. In the 25-34 demo, 59% are weekly listeners online.

Audiometrics' first market research to measure listening behaviour was published today and presented to key companies from the online audio sector at the initial meeting of the IAB's Audio Council in London.

Meanwhile RAJAR (Radio Joint Audience Research), which measures and profiles the audiences of UK radio stations, reported recently that listening via digital platforms (online, DAB radio, and digital television services) was up 11% over last year, and total digital hours were up 14% (two-thirds of that are on DAB).

More than a third of all radio listening is now via digital, says RAJAR.

Read more on Audiometrics here and RAJAR's figures here.

Social Radio develops online "side channels" for South Bend rock station

Thursday, April 25, 2013 - 11:35am

Federated Media's WRBR/South Bend, IN ("103.9 The Bear") has launched a series of customizable online music streams powered by Social Radio, called "My Bear."

The service enables listeners to choose from seven different niches of rock music, and personalize their listening by skipping, banning, and voting on the songs they hear. Federated chief strategy officer James Derby told Inside Radio he thinks the "My Bear" service could potentially convert "P3 and P4 listeners" into "P1s" by way of more individually-tailored listening experiences.

Federated Media plans to add liners from the jocks as well as "interactive commercials" (the streams are just music and general sweepers now), according to the news source. The station says it will soon launch mobile apps and a social media presence. And should Federated deem the project a success, look for personalized versions of the company's other stations.

Social Radio powers the new Balut Radio, launched by TV5 New Media in the Philippines (RAIN coverage here).

Christian/conservative media company Salem no stranger to online and digital

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - 12:40pm

Religious media company Salem Communications has launched its ChristianRadio.com website as a portal to streams of its more than 60 Christian/conservative music and talk broadcast properties. The new portal also includes on-demand programming from Christian ministries as well as several live streaming Spanish-language Christian talk stations.

While Salem radio streams will still be available elsewhere (e.g. iHeartRadio), ChristianRadio.com will exclusively showcase Salem properties.

In addition to its extensive broadcast holdings, the Salem Web Network provides online Christian and conservative-themed websites, content, and streaming. Seventeen percent of Salem's Q4 revenue came from its online businesses; 15% across all of 2012.

"ChristianRadio.com is a joint effort of Salem's radio and new media divisions. Together we have built a content aggregator that gives our listeners, ministries and advertisers digital content delivery within an environment that is consistent with their values and ours," said Salem Radio Division President, Dave Santrella.

Radio's local digital revenue grows, but share is still dwarfed by newspaper and TV

Tuesday, February 26, 2013 - 12:20pm

Borrell Associates, in new research for the RAB, says radio's local digital ad revenues grew 22% in 2012 over the previous year -- slightly higher than the local media average of 20%. This follows news (in RAIN here) that radio's overall digital revenue was up 11%.

However, for the past three years radio has been losing local online market share to newspaper, TV, yellow pages and Internet companies, and radio's share of local online sits at just 2%.

"It looks like quite a few groups are breaking out and challenging their newspaper and TV competitors for a slice of that very large digital pie," said Borrell Associates CEO Gordon Borrell (pictured). He expects online ad revenue to pass $420 million this year for radio.

RAB CEO and president Erica Farber (also pictured) said, "Revenue opportunities continue to grow for those who are pushing the digital limits with online and mobile initiatives." Farber, by the way, will keynote RAIN Summit West April 7 in Las Vegas. Please see more information here.

The new report is called "Benchmarking: Local Radio Stations’ Online Revenues," and is available to RAB members here. The RAB and Gordon Borrell will present the findings with a free webinar Thursday, March 7 (more info here).

Read more in NetNewsCheck here.

Nielsen to add online viewing to TV ratings

Monday, February 25, 2013 - 12:00pm

Nielsen says it will expand its definition of "TV" and begin measuring television audiences by including viewing via the Internet.

The ratings company reportedly hopes to measure viewership of streaming content in 23-thousand TV households by next fall, plus video viewing on the iPad by the end of the year.

Read more in Wired here.

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