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CDS Mobile to connect national advertisers to local radio, TV, and newspaper mobile sites

Thursday, May 3, 2012 - 12:05pm

Cox Digital Solutions has launched CDS Mobile, a new division to allow national advertisers to buy ads on local media mobile sites and national "vertical content" sites.

"Advertisers would potentially have the option of getting discounted rates from a cross-platform buy," MediaPost writes. "Cox will also offer publishers a suite of ad-serving technologies and tools for mobile, as it now does for Web advertising."

Leif Welch, who'll lead the new division, estimates Cox Digital’s mobile audience at about 90 million unique monthly visitors.

Cox Media Group itself owns 86 radio stations in 20 U.S. markets, as well as newspapers, television stations, and a cable channel. Cox mobile sites alone attracted 912 million page views in 2011, and mobile now accounts for 15%-30% of all digital inventory (according to Leif Welch, who'll lead CDS Mobile). The Cox Digital network (which extends beyond Cox-owned media) consists of over 2,600 total local newspaper, TV, and radio websites.

Mobile web and content traffoc has generally grown much faster than publishers' ability to monetize that audience. MediaPost reports that unsold mobile inventory is estimated at 80% across the industry -- and that's after last year's estimated 149% growth (to $1.6 billion) in U.S. mobile ad spending in 2011.

Read MediaPost's coverage here. The Cox Digital Solutions press release is here.

USC Annenberg study shows listening to radio as common an online activity as paying bills

Friday, December 16, 2011 - 12:05pm

You may have seen news coverage yesterday of the highlights from ten years of research on Americans' use and attitudes towards the Internet and new technology. The studies were done by the Annenberg School for Communication's Center for the Digital Future, at USC.

While most news sources focused on the report's dire predictions for print media ("Most print newspapers will be gone in five years"), kudos to Inside Radio for digging a little deeper for this tidbit: 22% of study respondents report "going on the Internet at least weekly" to "listen to online radio."Slacker on an iPad

[That data point is actually not from the recently-released highlights of the studies' findings over the last ten years; rather, it's from the 2010 Digital Future Report -- the tenth annual study in the series -- which was released in June.]

While that figure was outranked by online activities like general web-browsing, online banking, social networking, and gaming -- it's interesting that 22% is also the share of respondents who pay bills online. Also keep in mind that the "to listen to online radio" response was distinct from the "to download or listen to music" response (38%).

Here's another point the Annenberg summary made that should be of interest to broadcasters and webcasters: Over the next three years the tablet computer (e.g. Apple iPad) will become consumers' primary tool for most online/computing activities. Use of the trusty desktop will drop to 4-6% (laptops too!). "For the vast majority of Americans, the tablet will be the computer tool of choice by the middle of the decade, while the desktop PC fades away," the research summary reads. Food for thought.

Read Annenberg's highlights and predictions from their ten years of study here. Read highlights from the 2010 Digital Future Report (that has the online radio figure Inside Radio reported) here.

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