MOG

Beats working on iTunes service with built-in subscription music streaming

Friday, August 31, 2012 - 12:05pm

BeatsAfter purchasing streaming music service MOG in July (RAIN coverage here), Beats apparently has some big plans. The company -- famous for its iconic headphones -- is working on an iTunes-like service that would include subscription-based music streaming.

Beats is also reportedly working on its own smartphone (Android-based with its own custom UI, manufactured by HTC) and, believe it or not, a TV. "The purpose, we’re told," writes Boy Genius Report, "is to make a push to create an Apple-like experience that extends from a phone to a TV to a tablet to a laptop, much in the same way Apple does with Apple TV, AirPlay and iTunes." 

Find more from Boy Genius Report here.

Townsquare Media buys MOG's music blog ad network

Friday, August 24, 2012 - 12:35pm

Townsquare Media Group, owner of 244 radio stations in 51 markets, plus music web sites like PopCrush, Ultimate Classic Rock and Taste of Country, has acquired MOG Music Network, an ad network that reps music blogs.

In July, Beats bought the other half of the MOG company, the on-demand music streaming service (see RAIN here). Townsquare reportedly paid $10 million for the ad network, which it will rename Townsquare Media.

Read more in the New York Times here and AllThingsDigital here.

Beats buying MOG to offer consumers "integrated experience...from point of discovery to point of playback"

Monday, July 2, 2012 - 11:35am

MOGIt's official: audio technology company Beats Electronics is acquiring music streaming service MOG, reports USA Today.

Terms of the deal have not been disclosed, but the L.A. Times and Evolver.fm pin the figure at less than $10 million. Engadget writes, "MOG is said to have raised $33 million in funding to date, so that might give you a ballpark figure."

We first heard rumors about the acquisition in March (RAIN coverage here). Beats Electronics is the company behind those iconic Beats By Dr. Dre headphones. It's also partly owned by major mobile device maker HTC (though it's "unclear how or whether" that company is involved in this deal, reports Engadget).

Evolver.fm's Eliot Van Buskirk sees possibilities for HTC though: "Between Beats, MOG, and its own stuff, HTC can now connect the dots between smartphones, headphones/speakers, and a freemium music subscription, offering ample opportunities for bundling and co-branding."

"Time will tell exactly how we integrate our products and services," said MOG founder/CEO David Hyman. "The addition of MOG's music service to the Beats portfolio will provide a truly end-to-end music experience."

"For now, MOG will remain the same product today as it was yesterday and offer the same rich experience," said Beats president/COO Luke Wood. "What we do know is that we're committed to offering an integrated experience for the consumer — from the point of discovery to the point of playback."

Beats

MOG was founded in 2005. Though an on-demand music service like Spotify, MOG has long offered noteworthy streaming radio services (find RAIN's review of their radio offerings from 2009 here). It offers 16 million songs and reportedly has around 500,000 registered users.

MOG has actively partnered with device- and automakers, including BMW, Ford, Logitech, Samsung, LGBarnes & Noble and others.

You can find more coverage from USA Today here, the L.A. Times here, Engadget here and Evolver.fm here.

Evolver's Van Buskirk says services that pay as people listen will help kill the "one-hit wonder"

Friday, June 8, 2012 - 11:45am

While artists advocates complain about low payouts from streaming services like Spotify, Evolver.fm's Eliot Van Buskirk makes that point that such services may in fact be doing something far more important: helping to improve our shared musical culture.

Here's his argument: The economics of the music business of the past rewarded labels and artists when a record was purchased. Getting the customer to lay down the cash at the record store or the iTunes store was all that mattered. Whether that record became a lifelong favorite of the purchaser -- or they listened to it once and never again -- didn't matter. This reality incentivized the creation of "one-hit-wonders capable of moving product quickly."

But music consumption is moving away from the "upfront payment" of purchasing product, and towards "pay as you use" streaming services (Spotify, YouTube, Pandora, MOG, iHeartRadio, Rdio, Rhapsody). In this world, copyright owners and artists will earn not by creating a product that convinces a listener to take a one-time action (make the purchase), but by creating art that the listener wants to enjoy again and again.

"It’s no longer enough to convince fans to buy a disc once," writes Van Buskirk. "Instead, artists and labels have to turn them into lifelong fans."

More from Van Buskirk: "This new phase of music consumption...is just what music fans who are sick of one-hit wonders and flashy pop hits need. By paying out only when people actually listen instead of suckering fans into buying something only to leave it on the shelf... on-demand unlimited music services build an incentive into the music business to create works of lasting value."

As we've argued the Internet may usher in a new golden age of radio, Van Buskirk wistfully hopes for a return to a time "when labels used to spend years or decades developing an artist instead of releasing whatever they think will sell that week."

Read Van Buskirk in Evolver.fm here.

Ford adds MOG to in-car Sync system; Mazda to integrate Pandora

Thursday, June 7, 2012 - 11:40am

MOG and Ford SyncYet another streaming music service has arrived on Ford dashboards. The on-demand service MOG is now supported through the automaker's Sync system.

Listeners can control MOG playback via voice commands, just like they can already do with Pandora, TuneIn, Slacker, Stitcher, iHeartRadio and other music services. Commands include "Artist only," or "similar artists," or even "shuffle favorites." Users can even create presets like they would for AM/FM stations.

A connected smartphone is required to listen to streaming music services in Ford vehicles. Engadget has more coverage here.

Meanwhile, Mazda will add Pandora to its models later this year. Users will be able to control Pandora playback -- including thumbs-ups and -downs -- via their Mazda dashboard. Pandora-friendly Mazdas are expecting to arrive this fall

Pandora says it now has partnerships with 19 automotive brands. You can find its press release here.

MOG launches iPad app

Monday, March 26, 2012 - 11:40am

MOG's new iPad appOn-demand music service MOG launched a new app for iPads over the weekend.

Business Insider reports the app "offers an identical list of features as its iPod/iPhone counterpart, the only difference being that the interface fills the iPad's screen." The publication also argues (here) MOG's iPad app debut "makes Spotify's lack of an iPad presence all the more glaring."

It's rumored that MOG is being acquired by Beats Audio, of which major phone-maker HTC is a majority shareholder (RAIN coverage here).

Syndicate content