Mike Agovino

Aid for Pandora, or a new path for broadcasters? Two more industry experts analyze CC/Big Machine deal

Monday, June 18, 2012 - 11:15am

Clear ChannelWeeks later, Clear Channel's groundbreaking royalty deal with Big Machine is still sending tremors through the industry (RAIN coverage here). Two experts recently shared what they see as the takeaway from the new partnership.

Music industry attorney Steve Gordon writes in Digital Music News (here) that Clear Channel's deal is good news for Pandora and anyone else looking for more equitable streaming royalty rates. Clear Channel doesn't want to pay the "ridiculous" royalty bills that Pandora has now, argues Gordon, "Which means that instead of screaming bloody murder into the wind, Pandora now has the biggest ally imaginable."

Meanwhile, co-founder and Chief Operating Office of Triton Digital Mike Agovino writes in TechCrunch (here) that he sees Clear Channel "[leading] the way for traditional radio providers looking to go digital."

Agovino hopes more broadcasters will -- like Clear Channel -- start seeing digital as an opportunity, not a threat. "The key to making it online is working with the music industry to make that digital future a reality –- sooner rather than later."

L.A. Times spotlights Triton Digital

Tuesday, October 11, 2011 - 12:00pm

Triton Digital's founders Neal Schore (left) and Mike Agovino (right)"Like Levi Strauss, who got rich selling goods to immigrants during the Gold Rush, the founders of Triton Digital are making their fortune by providing the technology to radio companies wanting to mine digital gold."

So begins the L.A. Times' feature on Triton Digital and its founders: Neal Schore and Mike Agovino. The article follows the "old-school radio executives" from their decision to start Triton to what the company is up to today. You can find it right here.

Syndicate content