RAIN 9/16: MOG, Rdio offer on-demand and radio-like services for free

Michael Schmitt
September 16, 2011 - 12:00pm

On-demand music services MOG and Rdio made headlines this week for launching limited free versions to users, much like Spotify. These new free offerings include radio-like features that -- thanks to the on-demand nature of MOG and RdioRdio -- give users somewhat more control over the music than they would find from webcasters.

Both Rdio and MOG -- like Spotify and other on-demand services -- allow users to find and listen to whatever songs they want (for example, OK Computer  by Radiohead in its entirety).

But users can also create instant, radio-like artist-based playlists with Rdio and MOG -- much like Pandora or other webcasters. But unlike Pandora, MOG and Rdio let users decide if they want similar artists in the radio playlist at all (as in, I could create a MOG radio station with just Radiohead's music).MOG's new free service, complete with radio-like offerings

MOG's player (pictured above) even provides a slider to fine-tune just how much similar music you want in your radio playlist. Users can also see the entire playlist, skip as many tracks ahead as they'd like or revist previously-heard tracks
 
These features aren't new, but previously users would have to pay $5-10 per month to use them. Now they're completely free, just like Pandora, Slacker, Last.fm, iHeartRadio and other Internet radio services.

That said, the free services are limited. MOG's service includes ads and limits how much music users can play in a month (though they can earn more in game-like ways, as Wired explains here). Rdio's free offering may simply be an extended free trial, as MediaBeat writes here.

Paul Maloney
September 16, 2011 - 12:00pm

A new national survey from Arbitron, Edison Research, and Scarborough Research examined both consumer usage of sixteen different in-car media and entertainment choices. While AM/FM radio still has the lion's share of usage on theThe Radio Show logo road, the study found that in July 2010, 15% of "in-car" time was spent with devices that aren't AM/FM radio or a CD player. A quarter of respondents have used an iPod/MP3 player to listen to audio in the car; 55% of 18-24s have. Six percent of 18+ (19% of 18-24) have specifically listened to Pandora in the car. The study, called The Road Ahead: Media and Entertainment in the Car, also gauged consumer interest in new "telematics" (which enables apps that connect the car to information and entertainment networks). Four in ten said they're interested in "pause, rewind and replay functionality" for radio in-car, while a similar percentage are interested in built-in wireless internet for the car. Read more here.

Streaming delivery network Liquid Compass announced the release of LC Pro 2.0, the company's latest streaming radio platform, and an update to their Client Control Center. They also announced new clients, including Merlin Media, Cromwell Radio, Rich Broadcasting and Rick Dees. Liquid Compass also announced it had renewed with Saga Communications (owner of stations in 26 U.S. markets). Read more here.

Mobile marketing tech company Mogreet has announced the release of its new Mocast Broadcast Platform a "rich media, social and mobile ad monetization" platform for broadcasters, designed to grow radio listening audiences and, most importantly, take advantage of the hyper-growth in local and national mobile advertising. Read more here.

Critical Media announced Syndicaster Radio to allow broadcasters to create and distribute (plus add video or photo slideshows to clips, title, tag, publish, distribute and syndicate) radio content they can immediately monetize online. The platform also creates text transcripts, making all radio segments searchable. Read more here.

Mushroom Networks announced Streamer, a portable device that can "bond" multiple fixed or wireless broadband connections into a single high-speed connection for the purpose of remotely live-streaming high-quality video and audio. Streamer can works with various equipment and any CDN. Read more here.

Paul Maloney
September 16, 2011 - 12:00pm

Southern California NPR flagship and streaming radio leader KCRW has released a free app for the Apple iPad, called "Music Mine," to give listeners a way to sample and discover new music handpicked by its staff. The app was developed by Public Radio Exchange (PRX), designed by Roundarch using The Echo Nest’s music intelligence technology.

"This special format allows users who don’t have a lot of time to put together their own listening experience without being overwhelmed by options," a KCRW press release explains. "Listeners who want to delve into the world of each artist can find video, photos, blog posts and more, through a fun interactive interface designed specifically for the iPad. Fans who want a lean-back experience can simply tap KCRW's 24-hour, all-music stream Eclectic24."

Read more here.

Michael Schmitt
September 16, 2011 - 12:00pm

DVR-like radio recording web DAR.fmservice DAR.fm (from entrepeneur Michael Robertson) now offers users the ability to download their recorded shows to their Apple, Android or BlackBerry mobile devices.

Users can download one show or series for free, or 10 shows/series for $40 per year. Radio Ink has more coverage here and you can watch a video tutorial from DAR.fm here.