2/5/13: PC Magazine reviewer eagerly awaiting SiriusXM personalized radio feature

Paul Maloney
February 5, 2013 - 1:20pm

SiriusXM's custom streaming radio service is still in beta, and PCMag.com's Jeffrey Wilson can't wait for the official launch. He concluded his review, "MySXM gave me the personalization features I longed for while delivering the unexpected ability to filter my channels by favorite music eras."

The "MySXM" -- this is only for Internet streaming, and only for the desktop -- is currently limited to 40 channels. After launching a channel, the listener can customize the stream by adjusting three "sliders." The sliders scale the proportion of music of different Style, Popularity, and Era (in the image, the "My 70s on 7" channel can be balanced between "Soul/Disco" or "Rock" for Style).

SiriusXm hasn't yet announced when they plan to officially launch MySXM, but it will reportedly be available only on the desktop to start (though it seems likely to be ported to mobile devices as well).

Read the PCMag.com review here.

Paul Maloney
February 5, 2013 - 1:20pm

Graphical buttons uncovered by iPhone "jailbreakers" are reinvigorating the rumor mill concerning an Apple streaming radio serviceArsTechnica reports the graphical buttons (one that looks like a transmitter tower with "radiating" lines) were discovered in the Music app in iOS 6.1. 

It's been rumored since late last year that Apple would launch a customizable streaming radio service (a la Pandora) some time in 2013.

There's really nothing more than that to report. Ars says there's no explicit reference to a streaming service within the iOS, and the images don't connect to anything.

Read more in Ars Technica here.

Paul Maloney
February 5, 2013 - 1:20pm

Beasley Broadcasting is reportedly the latest radio group to ink a deal with Big Machine Label Group to soften streaming royalties in exchange for a small on-air royalty for the group's sound recordings.

Like other broadcasters such as Clear Channel and Entercom, Beasley will pay Big Machine a percentage of revenue from on-air ads to play artists like Taylor Swift, Tim McGraw, Rascal Flatts and Reba. In exchange, Big Machine will "allow digital simulcasts of the over-the-air signals by Beasley Broadcast to scale affordably to support the growth of Beasley's digital platform." (In other words, reduced streaming royalties.)

Industry attorney David Oxenford recently suggested deals like this may have an effect favorable to webcasters in upcoming royalty rate determinations: "The pro-record company outcome of the CRB proceedings may well be changed if these deals can be shown to be representative of the real value of the public performance of the sound recording." (Read more in RAIN here)

Read more on Beasley and Big Machine from RadioInfo.com here.